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Singapore Invests S$300 Million in National Quantum Strategy

Singapore bay by night
Singapore bay by night

Insider Brief

  • Singapore has announced its National Quantum Strategy (NQS), backed by nearly S$300 million, about $219 million US.
  • The strategy comprises four major initiatives: the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT), the Quantum Engineering Programme 3.0 (QEP 3.0), the National Quantum Processor Initiative (NQPI), and the National Quantum Scholarships Scheme (NQSS).
  • This plan aims to position Singapore as a leading hub for quantum technology over the next five years.

Singapore has announced its National Quantum Strategy (NQS), backed by nearly S$300 million — about $219 million US — in funding from the nation’s Research, Innovation, and Enterprise 2025 (RIE 2025) plan. This initiative aims to position Singapore as a leading hub for quantum technology over the next five years, according to a government fact sheet.

According to information provided by the government, the National Quantum Strategy (NQS) focuses on four strategic thrusts: enhancing scientific excellence in quantum research, strengthening engineering capabilities to translate research into real-world solutions, developing a robust talent pipeline and fostering innovation and enterprise partnerships to build a vibrant quantum industry.

Key Initiatives and Programs

The NQS will back four funding initiatives: the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT), the Quantum Engineering Programme 3.0 (QEP 3.0), the National Quantum Processor Initiative (NQPI), and the National Quantum Scholarships Scheme (NQSS). These programs will drive advancements in quantum research, engineering, and talent development.

The CQT, currently hosted by the National University of Singapore, will be elevated to a flagship national research center. The center could then coordinate quantum research efforts across institutions such as the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), National University of Singapore (NUS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) as stated in the fact sheet.

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Quantum sensors are a rapidly developing technology within the quantum industry. QEP 3.0 will introduce a new National Quantum Sensor Programme to enhance Singapore’s capabilities in quantum sensing technologies. This program will help bring about collaborations with industry partners on research projects in various fields, including environmental monitoring and biomedical imaging.

The NQPI will focus on developing Singapore’s own quantum processors, promoting innovation and collaboration through the National Quantum Computing Hub. The goal will be to make these processors accessible to researchers and industry partners.

“We will establish a new National Quantum Processor Initiative to build capabilities in the design and build of quantum processors in Singapore,” Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat said during in a speech at the Asia Tech x Singapore Summit, as reported by The Economic Times-India.

Developing Talent and Industry Partnerships

According to the government statement: “Talent is a fundamental enabler of the National Quantum Strategy, and the key to realizing Singapore’s quantum vision.”

To build a skilled workforce, the NQSS will offer scholarships for up to 100 PhD and 100 Master-level students over the next five years. This effort aims to meet the demands of both the research and industry sectors in quantum technologies.

The NQS will also foster a vibrant quantum industry by strengthening partnerships with companies and supporting the growth of startups in the quantum technology space. The National Quantum Computing Hub will play a crucial role in translating quantum R&D into practical applications in finance, drug discovery, and logistics.

For more information on the National Quantum Strategy and collaboration opportunities, visit the National Quantum Office (NQO) website.

Matt Swayne

With a several-decades long background in journalism and communications, Matt Swayne has worked as a science communicator for an R1 university for more than 12 years, specializing in translating high tech and deep tech for the general audience. He has served as a writer, editor and analyst at The Quantum Insider since its inception. In addition to his service as a science communicator, Matt also develops courses to improve the media and communications skills of scientists and has taught courses. [email protected]

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